OSHA Implements a 78% Increase in Penalties- Is Your Office Compliant?

OSHA Implements a 78% Increase in Penalties- Is Your Office Compliant?


Published: August 23rd, 2016

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) just issued new penalty adjustments that will go into effect this month, based on recent legislation that requires federal agencies to adjust their civil penalties to account for inflation. It has been more than 25 years since OSHA last adjusted their maximum penalties, therefor an increase of 78% will be implemented. Moving forward, penalties will be adjusted each year for inflation. Now more than ever, it is imperative for medical offices to be proactive to ensure their compliance.

If an OSHA inspector conducts an inspection and unsafe or unhealthy working conditions are found, a list of citations and proposed penalties will be sent to the employer by certified mail. A posted copy of the citation must be placed at or near the place the violation occurred for three days or until the violation is abated, whichever is longer. The different types of violations and penalties are:

Current and New Maximum Penalties Are As Follows:

Type of violation:

  • Serious
    • Current Maximum Penalty:
    • New Maximum Penalty: 
  • Other-Than-Serious
    • Current Maximum Penalty:
    • New Maximum Penalty: 
  • Posting Requirement
    • Current Maximum Penalty: $7,000 per violation
    • New Maximum Penalty: $12,471 per violation
  • Failure to Abate
    • Current Maximum Penalty: $7,000 per day beyond abatement date
    • New Maximum Penalty: $12,471 per day beyond abatement date
  • Willful or Repeated
    • Current Maximum Penalty: $70,000 per violation
    • New Maximum Penalty: $124,709 per violation

Adjustments to Penalties

To provide guidance to field staff on the implementation of the new penalties, OSHA issued revisions to its Field Operations Manual. To address the impact of these penalty increases on smaller businesses, OSHA will continue to provide penalty reductions based on the size of the employer and other factors.

State Plan States

States that operate their own Occupational Safety and Health Plans are required to adopt maximum penalty levels that are at least as effective as Federal OSHA's.

For More Assistance: 

Visit www.osha.gov

Contact MEDSAFE www.medsafe.com or (888)-MED-SAFE for compliance assistance or questions.